An American Childhood

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An American Childhood

An American Childhood
  • Author : Annie Dillard
  • Publisher :
  • Release Date :2009-10-13
  • Total pages :272
  • ISBN : 9780061843136
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Summary : A book that instantly captured the hearts of readers across the country, An American Childhood is Pulitzer Prize-winning author Annie Dillard's poignant, vivid memoir of growing up in Pittsburgh in the 1950s.

An American Childhood

An American Childhood
  • Author : Annie Dillard
  • Publisher :
  • Release Date :2016-04-07
  • Total pages :272
  • ISBN : 1782117768
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Summary : An American Childhood is the electrifying memoir of the wide-eyed and unconventional upbringing that influenced the lifetime love of nature and the stunning writing career of Pulitzer Prize winner Annie Dillard. From her mother's boundless energy to her father's low-budget horror movies, jokes and lonesome river trips down to New Orleans to get away, the events of Dillard's 1950s Pittsburgh childhood loom larger than life. An American Childhood fizzes with the playful observations and sparkling prose of this American master, illuminating the seemingly ordinary and yet always thrilling, dizzying moments of a childhood and adolescence lived fearlessly.

An American Childhood

An American Childhood
  • Author : Annie Dillard
  • Publisher :
  • Release Date :1988-07-20
  • Total pages :272
  • ISBN : 9780060915186
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Summary : A book that instantly captured the hearts of readers across the country, An American Childhood is Pulitzer Prize-winning author Annie Dillard's poignant, vivid memoir of growing up in Pittsburgh in the 1950s.

Pagan Time

Pagan Time
  • Author : Micah Perks
  • Publisher :
  • Release Date :2012-06-01
  • Total pages :176
  • ISBN : 1619020955
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Summary : With little more than a run-down Jeep and their newborn baby in tow, author Micah Perks' parents set out in 1963 to build a school and a utopian community in the mountains. The school would become known as a place to send teens with drug addictions and emotional problems, children with whom Micah and her sister would grow up. This complex memoir mixes a moving celebration of the utopian spirit and its desire for community and freedom with a lacerating critique of the consequences of those desires — especially for the children involved. How could the campaign for a perfect home and family create such confusion and destruction? The '60s, for many, became a laboratory of hope and chaos, as young idealists tested the limits of possibility. Micah Perks has cast her unflinching and precise eye on her own history and has illuminated not only those years of her childhood, but a wide-open moment that marked our culture for all time.

Huck's Raft

Huck's Raft
  • Author : Steven Mintz
  • Publisher :
  • Release Date :2004
  • Total pages :445
  • ISBN : 9780674015081
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Summary : Explores many aspects of the changing societal role of children throughout American history, and credits the impact that children have had on major historical events.

Canal Zone Daughter

Canal Zone Daughter
  • Author : Judy Haisten
  • Publisher :
  • Release Date :2012
  • Total pages :279
  • ISBN : 9781614930853
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Summary : In 1964, Edwin and Jean Armbruster left their home in the United States to raise their family on the Panama Canal Zone, a little known American territory in the Central American country of Panama. In Canal Zone Daughter, Judy (Armbruster) Haisten chronicles her unique childhood culminating to the crushing loss when former President Jimmy Carter signs treaties that effectively eliminates her -and fellow U.S. citizens' -former home. Charming, funny, and poignant, the author captures her remarkable American story in an exotic place and time. www.canalzonedaughter.com

An Un-American Childhood

An Un-American Childhood
  • Author : Ann Kimmage
  • Publisher :
  • Release Date :1998-10-01
  • Total pages :288
  • ISBN : 9780820320786
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Summary : This is the story of a young woman's secret life behind the Iron Curtain.

Rust Belt Boy

Rust Belt Boy
  • Author : Paul Hertneky
  • Publisher :
  • Release Date :2016
  • Total pages :223
  • ISBN : 9780872332225
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Summary : Tales of a largely unknown and recurrent Promised Land, revealing the soul of industrial life, and a yearning for broader horizons

Three by Annie Dillard

Three by Annie Dillard
  • Author : Annie Dillard
  • Publisher :
  • Release Date :1990-11-21
  • Total pages :624
  • ISBN : 9780060920647
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Summary : A stunning collection of Annie Dillard's most popular books in one volume.

Jim Fobel's Old-Fashioned Baking Book

Jim Fobel's Old-Fashioned Baking Book
  • Author : Jim Fobel
  • Publisher :
  • Release Date :1996
  • Total pages :207
  • ISBN : 9780962740367
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Summary : Presents recipes for cakes, pies, quick breads, coffee cakes, cookies, yeast breads, frostings, and glazes, and includes useful baking tips

American Childhood

American Childhood
  • Author : Anne Scott MacLeod
  • Publisher :
  • Release Date :1995-10-01
  • Total pages :256
  • ISBN : 9780820318035
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Summary : In this collection of fourteen essays, Anne Scott MacLeod locates and describes shifts in the American concept of childhood as those changes are suggested in nearly two centuries of children's stories. Most of the essays concern domestic novels for children or adolescents--stories set more or less in the time of their publication. Some essays also draw creatively on childhood memoirs, travel writings that contain foreigners' observations of American children, and other studies of children's literature. The topics on which MacLeod writes range from the current politicized marketplace for children's books, to the reestablishment (and reconfiguration) of the family in recent children's fiction, to the ways that literature challenges or enforces the idealization of children. MacLeod sometimes considers a single author's canon, as when she discusses the feminism of the Nancy Drew mystery series or the Orwellian vision of Robert Cormier. At other times, she looks at a variety of works within a particular period, for example, Jacksonian America, the post-World War II decade, or the 1970s. MacLeod also examines books that were once immensely popular but currently have no appreciable readership--the Horatio Alger stories, for example--and finds fresh, intriguing ways to view the work of such well-known writers as Louisa May Alcott, Beverly Cleary, and Paul Zindel.

The End of American Childhood

The End of American Childhood
  • Author : Paula S. Fass
  • Publisher :
  • Release Date :2017-11-07
  • Total pages :352
  • ISBN : 0691178208
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Summary : The End of American Childhood takes a sweeping look at the history of American childhood and parenting, from the nation's founding to the present day. Renowned historian Paula Fass shows how, since the beginning of the American republic, independence, self-definition, and individual success have informed Americans' attitudes toward children. But as parents today hover over every detail of their children's lives, are the qualities that once made American childhood special still desired or possible? Placing the experiences of children and parents against the backdrop of social, political, and cultural shifts, Fass challenges Americans to reconnect with the beliefs that set the American understanding of childhood apart from the rest of the world. Fass examines how freer relationships between American children and parents transformed the national culture, altered generational relationships among immigrants, helped create a new science of child development, and promoted a revolution in modern schooling. She looks at the childhoods of icons including Margaret Mead and Ulysses S. Grant—who, as an eleven-year-old, was in charge of his father's fields and explored his rural Ohio countryside. Fass also features less well-known children like ten-year-old Rose Cohen, who worked in the drudgery of nineteenth-century factories. Bringing readers into the present, Fass argues that current American conditions and policies have made adolescence socially irrelevant and altered children's road to maturity, while parental oversight threatens children's competence and initiative. Showing how American parenting has been firmly linked to historical changes, The End of American Childhood considers what implications this might hold for the nation's future.

The Seventeen Traditions

The Seventeen Traditions
  • Author : Ralph Nader
  • Publisher :
  • Release Date :2009-10-13
  • Total pages :160
  • ISBN : 0061736759
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Summary : “The Seventeen Traditions brings us back to what’s important in life—and what makes America truly great.” —Jim Hightower, Illinois Times The activist, humanitarian, and former presidential candidate named one of the 100 most influential figures in American history by The Atlantic—one of only three living Americans so honored—Ralph Nader, looks back at his small-town Connecticut childhood and the traditions and values that shaped his progressive worldview. At once eye-opening, thought-provoking, and surprisingly fresh and moving, Nader’s The Seventeen Traditions is a celebration of uniquely American ethics certain to appeal to fans of Mitch Albom, Tim Russert, and Anna Quindlen—an unexpected and most welcome gift from this fearlessly committed reformer and outspoken critic of corruption in government and society. In a time of widespread national dissatisfaction and disillusionment that has given rise to new dissent characterized by the Occupy Wall Street movement, the liberal icon shows us how every American can learn from The Seventeen Traditions and, by embracing them, help bring about meaningful and necessary change.

Everything Is Wrong with Me

Everything Is Wrong with Me
  • Author : Jason Mulgrew
  • Publisher :
  • Release Date :2010-03-02
  • Total pages :240
  • ISBN : 9780061978432
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Summary : “People who grow up like this tend to become agoraphobics, serial killers, or really funny writers. Mulgrew, I think – hope? – is the last of these three things. His stories of childhood made me laugh out loud.” — Rob McElhenney, star, creator, and producer of It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia “The somewhat alarming, always interesting world inside Jason’s brain has now been strewn across the pages of a book. Godspeed, reader.” — Steve Hely, author of How I Became a Famous Novelist Jason Mulgrew’s wildly popular blog “Everything Is Wrong With Me: 30, Bipolar and Hungry,” gives rise to a memoir of startling insight, comedy, and irreversible, unconscionable stupidity.

Racial Innocence

Racial Innocence
  • Author : Robin Bernstein
  • Publisher :
  • Release Date :2011-12-01
  • Total pages :318
  • ISBN : 0814789781
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Summary : 2013 Book Award Winner from the International Research Society in Children's Literature 2012 Outstanding Book Award Winner from the Association for Theatre in Higher Education 2012 Winner of the Lois P. Rudnick Book Prize presented by the New England American Studies Association 2012 Runner-Up, John Hope Franklin Publication Prize presented by the American Studies Association 2012 Honorable Mention, Distinguished Book Award presented by the Society for the Study of American Women Writers Part of the American Literatures Initiative Series Beginning in the mid nineteenth century in America, childhood became synonymous with innocence—a reversal of the previously-dominant Calvinist belief that children were depraved, sinful creatures. As the idea of childhood innocence took hold, it became racialized: popular culture constructed white children as innocent and vulnerable while excluding black youth from these qualities. Actors, writers, and visual artists then began pairing white children with African American adults and children, thus transferring the quality of innocence to a variety of racial-political projects—a dynamic that Robin Bernstein calls “racial innocence.” This phenomenon informed racial formation from the mid nineteenth century through the early twentieth. Racial Innocence takes up a rich archive including books, toys, theatrical props, and domestic knickknacks which Bernstein analyzes as “scriptive things” that invite or prompt historically-located practices while allowing for resistance and social improvisation. Integrating performance studies with literary and visual analysis, Bernstein offers singular readings of theatrical productions from blackface minstrelsy to Uncle Tom’s Cabin to The Wonderful Wizard of Oz; literary works by Joel Chandler Harris, Harriet Wilson, and Frances Hodgson Burnett; material culture including Topsy pincushions, Uncle Tom and Little Eva handkerchiefs, and Raggedy Ann dolls; and visual texts ranging from fine portraiture to advertisements for lard substitute. Throughout, Bernstein shows how “innocence” gradually became the exclusive province of white children—until the Civil Rights Movement succeeded not only in legally desegregating public spaces, but in culturally desegregating the concept of childhood itself. Check out the author's blog for the book here.